Architecture Degree Programme at “Ion Mincu” University of Architecture and Urban Planning

The Faculty of Architecture / Architecture (English taught)
1st Year, sem 1, 2023-2024

IT-2E | Continuity and Discontinuity within the Historic Evolution of the Architectural Phenomenon (I) - Antiquity and the Middle Ages

Compulsory Course | Hours/Week: 2C | ECTS Credits: 3

First lecture and communication ways

000 Communication ways.pdf
001 About the first lecture.pdf
002 Invitation for the first lecture.pdf
003 New starting hour.pdf

Information Sources

001 Literature aphe 1 2023-2024.pdf
002 Topics reduction test and exam.pdf

Rules and Instructions

001 Promotion regulations aphe 1 2022-2023.pdf
002 Regulations lecture aphe 1 2023-2024.pdf
003 Development tests and exams.pdf
004 Reduction test questions.pdf

Reduction test

001 Reduction test questions.pdf
002 Development tests and exams.pdf
003 Topics reduction test and exam.pdf
004 Schedule reduction test.pdf
005 Consultation reduction test.pdf
006 Graded papers.pdf

Exam

001 Topics reduction test and exam.pdf
002 Development tests and exams.pdf
003 Exam consultation and schedule.pdf
004 Regarding the exam grades and papers.pdf

Resitting Exam

001 Topics reduction test and exam.pdf
002 Development tests and exams.pdf
003 Schedule resitting exam.pdf
Grades aphe 1 resitting exam and graded papers.pdf

Assessment Lecture

01 Lecture assessment 2023-2024.pdf
Aphe 1 New deadline lecture assessment.pdf

Resitting exam

Syllabus

IT-2E E Continuity and Discontinuity within the Historic Evolution of the Architectural Phenomenon (I) - Antiquity and the Middle Ages.pdf
Department:
History & Theory of Architecture and Heritage Conservation
Course Leader:
prof.dr.habil.arh. Hanna Derer
Teaching language:

English

Learning outcomes:

Using usual words
Structuring the foundation of the specific knowledge by studying the main composition principles present at the urban scale and that of the architectural object in antique times and the Middle Ages, analyzed from the perspective offered by defining aspects of the civilizations that have conceived them.

"Learning Outputs" (in "official" words)

Knowledge
As the first one for this field, the lecture inevitably stresses the mere absorption of knowledge (but simultaneously supports the development of certain abilities as well – see below).
- assimilation of knowledge regarding the history, theory and philosophy of architecture, the preservation of built cultural heritage, as well as arts, technologies and adjoint humanities, as factors able to define the quality of architectural designs;
- assimilation of knowledge regarding the history, theory and philosophy of architecture, the preservation of built cultural heritage, as well as arts, technologies and adjoint humanities, as factors able to define the quality of urban planning designs;
- assimilation of knowledge regarding the bearing / supporting structure, building physics, building technologies and equipment able to ensure comfortable interior spaces;
- assimilation of knowledge regarding the relationship between human beings and architectural products, between the latter and their surroundings, the architect’s vocation, and function within society,
and by all these,
- assimilation of knowledge regarding the architectural and urban planning design process, as defined by functional, structural, aesthetic and efficiency requirements.

Abilities
As the first one for this field, the lecture inevitably stresses the mere absorption of knowledge but simultaneously supports the development of certain abilities as well, abilities regarding
- the analytic approach of the architectural object, ensemble and even of the way space is organised at the settlements level and at that of the entire territory,
as the lecture gradually exposes different ways of
- organizing,
- understanding,
- controlling and
- representing (basically the) architectural space,
a process that ends with building the first components required to
- stylistically valuate on behalf of the essence behind the shape.

Responsability and autonomy
By (its own) nature, the field (history of architecture) and the lecture supports individual study and hence
- the raise of professional autonomy,
while by the way it is organized and progresses, the lecture – up to the last teaching gesture consisting in fulfilling the valuation questionnaire that used to comprise a rather large area for students to directly formulate their thoughts – supports as well
- the development of the personal capacity to take responsibility.
Unfortunately, as the given questionnaires are anonymous, the efforts made for this very last goal are partially in vain.

Content:

First accumulation periods and the first results: from the beginning of the construction activity to the architecture of prehellenic civilizations (1) and (2).
Antique classicism (1): Greece – from the urban scale to that of the architectural object.
The classical antiquity (2): religious architecture of Greece – object, detail, ensemble.
Antique classicism (3): the town as shape and essence, from the Etruscan civilization to that of Ancient Rome.
The classical antiquity (4): religious architecture of Rome – detail, object, context.
Antique classicism (5): Rome – the architectural object between idea and matter.
The common denominator: early Christian architecture.
The Byzantine Middle Ages (1): abandoning and creating models.
The Byzantine Middle Ages (2): space, volume and vocabulary of religious architecture.
Intermezzo? renaissances of the Western Middle Ages.
Continuity and discontinuity in the Middle Ages of western Europe: Romanesque accumulations and the Gothic “jump” (1).
Continuity and discontinuity in the Middle Ages of western Europe: Romanesque accumulations and the Gothic “jump” (2).
The Middle Ages all over Europe: comparative analysis.

Teaching Method:

lectures

Assessment:

as the case may be an optional reduction test, for certain exam

Bibliography:

E-books (as well)

Roth, Leland M.; Roth Clark, Amanda C., Understanding Architecture. Its Elements, History, and Meaning, 2018
Ching, Francis D. K.; Jarzombek, Mark M.; Prakash, Vikramaditya,
A Global History of Architecture, 2017
Harbison, Robert, Travels in the History of Architecture, 2011
Fletcher, Banister, Sir, A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method, 1953

Miles, Margaret M. (ed), A Companion to Greek Architecture, Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Ulrich, Roger B.; Quenemoen, Caroline K. (eds), A Companion to Roman Architecture, Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Ousterhout, Robert G., Eastern Medieval Architecture: The Building Traditions of Byzantium and Neighboring Lands, Oxford University Press, 2019
Armi, C. Edson, Design and Construction in Romanesque Architecture: First Romanesque Architecture and the Pointed Arch in Burgundy and Northern Italy, Cambridge University Press, 2003
[The title on Gothic architecture is not missing by coincidence.]

Books

Gympel, Jan, The Story of Architecture: from Antiquity to the Present, 2008
Roth, Leland, M., Understanding Architecture. Its Elements, History and Meaning, 2nd edition, Westview Press 2007
Ching, F., Jarzombek, M., Prakash, V., A global history of architecture, John Wiley ans Sons, Inc., New York, 2007
Moffett, M., Fazio, M., Wodehouse, L., A World History of Architecture, Laurence King ed., London 2003
Sutton, Ian, L’Architecture Occidentale de la Grèce antique à nos jours, Thames and Hudson SARL, Paris, (1999) 2001
Watkin, David, A history of western architecture, Laurence King ed., Londra 2000
Fletcher, Sir Banister, A History of Architecture on the Comparative Method, Londra, 1987
Ache, Jean Baptiste, Elements d’une histoire de l’art de batir, Paris, 1970
Mumford, Lewis, The City in History, Londra, 1961
Giedion, Sigfried, The Beginnings of Architecture, Oxford, 1964
Pevsner, Nikolaus, An Outline of European Architecture, Harmondsworth, 1943
prof.dr.arh. Sanda Voiculescu, Note de curs – antichitatea si evul mediu

Selective literature is provided at the beginning of each teaching cycle.